One of my earliest memories: stepping through the front door of a little southern California apartment into a new, beautiful world, wrapped like a present in a delicate layer of silver mist. Being about five years old, I reasoned that it must be magic, and I quickly retrieved a jar in which to catch this mysterious substance. I tried for what felt like hours, but the mist refused to stay where it was caught. Distraught but stubborn, I begged my mother to help me, and we researched a solution. With her assistance, I discovered that I could make my own magic, using the jar, matches, warm water, and ice to produce a tiny cloud of fog within. While this experience happened long ago, I will never forget the satisfaction of discovery, and the lingering earnest curiosity which has always served as a fundamental movitavor.A few years later, I began playing music. I started teaching myself piano at the age of thirteen, and my interests quickly spread to guitar and bass as well. I would practice for hours a day, enabled by homeschooling and obstinance, sitting cross-legged over a tiny amplifier out of until every tone and every note rang out clear and perfect. Through the music skills I honed over the years, I learned the incredible power of perseverance, and from that came the ability to grow my curiosities into self-motivation.My first patient was an elderly woman on a call to a nursing home. I was on my EMT internship. I was incredibly excited. I was terribly nervous. I wanted to give her the best care possible. She had fallen in her room, and was able to neither get up nor remember the fall. Despite being in a room full of other EMTs and paramedics, who acted as both buffer and counsel, I knew that she was my patient, and I knew that, for the first, and hopefully not the last time, I was responsible for the health and safety of another.I didn’t feel ready. I didn’t feel qualified in the slightest. Nothing I could have possibly learned in textbooks or in lectures or in discussions with mentors could have prepared me for that humbling moment of responsibility, for that realization that she was trusting absolutely in my education and knowledge to determine her well-being. While the foundation of my interest in EMS was simple curiosity, upon it was built a sense of responsibility that I can not imagine giving up. At a young age, I uncovered my desire for knowledge. Through playing music, I cultivated my ability to turn diligence into competence. In my brief time practicing my skills in the field of emergency medicine, I learned the heavy responsibility of caring for a patient. Learning from and working with individuals in emergency medicine, especially paramedics, has allowed me to not only validate my desire to work in EMS, but also to determine why. I want to be a paramedic because I want to serve my community. I want the responsibility, the difficult decisions, and the diverse opportunities that this job can offer. I appreciate the opportunity to be a part of a team that works for our patients health and advocates for their best interest. It is for the above reasons that I look forward to a future career in emergency medicine.

Author